Invite for Newcomer Youth from Across Canada

2015 Youth Action Gathering Conference – Vancouver. B.C. – Oct. 3 & 4

The Canadian Council for Refugees, in partnership with Vancouver Foundation’s Fresh Voices Initiative and MOSAIC, invite newcomer youth from across Canada to participate in the 2015 Youth Action Gathering Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia.

The gathering brings together young immigrant and refugee leaders to learn, share, network and collaborate on actions towards common challenges and experiences of newcomer youth communities.

It is also an engaging weekend of leadership and skills building, developing peer relationships and FUN!

WHO Should Participate?

Everyone is welcome to apply; however, space is limited and priority will be given to:

  • Racialized* immigrant and refugee youth
  • Those who can make a commitment to attend the full event
  • Immigrant & refugee youth from across Canada, aged 16 to 25 years
  • Youth settlement workers and allies

*We recognize that race is a social construct, people as “racialized immigrant person” or “racialized people” are immigrants who also belong to a “racial minority”, “visible minority”, or are seen as “people of colour” or “non-White” (adjusted from OHRC).

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Clicklaw is now Mobile-Friendly

This June, we introduced the mobile-friendly version of Clicklaw Wikibooks.

Since then, mobile use of the Wikibooks has gone up nearly 50%.

Today, we’re happy to announce that the main Clicklaw website has also gone mobile-friendly! You can now better access the information available on Clicklaw—any time and anywhere.

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Can you spot any difference between Clicklaw mobile sites on Android vs. iOS?

Continue reading Clicklaw is now Mobile-Friendly

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Tell the Chief Judge what you think about online publication of criminal court information

by the Provincial Court of British Columbia
Cross-posted from eNews

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Visit the Provincial Court of BC website: provincialcourt.bc.ca

The B.C. Provincial Court appears to be the only criminal trial court in Canada that provides remote online access to adult criminal court case information. You can access accused persons’ names, charges, bail orders and sentences through Court Services Online (CSO).

Online access like this raises unique tensions between fundamental principles of open courts, the presumption of innocence, and the extent to which personal information should be widely circulated when the outcome of a criminal charge is something other than conviction. The Court’s current policy is not to display case information on CSO after a case has ended if the case has resulted in a stay, withdrawal of charges, or an acquittal or dismissal. The Chief Judge is also considering whether to adopt a policy not to display information about cases that have resulted in “peace bonds” under section 810 of the Criminal Code.

Because there has not been a broad public discussion about what the limits on online publication of criminal case information should be, the Chief Judge invites members of the public, including the media, to comment on these aspects of judicial policy. A Consultation Memorandum has been posted to the Provincial Court website. It outlines the issues and asks for your views. Your comments and discussion will help the Chief Judge determine whether these policies need adjusting and whether they achieve an appropriate balance between openness and privacy considerations.

The Consultation Memorandum also deals with another issue. Members of the media have found that CSO blocks access to case information whenever a publication ban is made. The memorandum explains how publication bans work on CSO and why this blocking happens. The Chief Judge also invites comment on this policy and suggestions for reasonable alternatives.

Please read the Consultation Memorandum to find:

  • information about the policies limiting access to case information when a stay, withdrawal, acquittal or dismissal has been entered;
  • reasons for considering a change to include peace bonds, options for change; and
  • information about the effect of publication bans on the information available on CSO.

Then please send your comments by September 18, 2015 to:

info@provincialcourt.bc.ca Re: CSO Policy Consultation
OR
CSO Policy Consultation
Attention: Mr. Gene Jamieson, Q.C., Senior Legal Officer
Office of the Chief Judge, Provincial Court of British Columbia
337 – 800 Hornby Street, Vancouver, B.C.

… and share them on Twitter @BCProvCourt.

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New Service Alert: Human Rights Clinic Provides Advocacy & Legal Representation

BC Human Rights ClinicToday’s post introduces a New Service from The BC Human Rights Clinic and Community Legal Assistance Society (CLAS), a Clicklaw contributor.

 

WHY THIS NEW SERVICE?

The new BC Human Rights Clinic is the result of a 2014 Ministry of Justice review, merging two human rights organizations:

The BC Human Rights Coalition, who operated advocacy, information, and education services for the Clinic, merged with CLAS, who were operating legal services for the Clinic.

WHO CAN USE THIS NEW SERVICE?

You may qualify for this service if you have a complaint before the BC Human Rights Tribunal and seek legal representation or advocacy. You first go through an intake process and must meet certain criteria to qualify. One example of what can qualify you for assistance is the inability to obtain legal representation for free or at a reduced rate from a legal provider.

WHAT CAN THIS NEW SERVICE DO FOR YOU?

Advocacy provided includes:
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  • filing amendments;
  • attending settlement meetings;
  • negotiating settlements;
  • making applications;
  • responding to applications;
  • and doing disclosure

Legal Representation provided if your case is not settled or dismissed includes:

  • clinic lawyers who may represent the complainant at a full hearing; or
  • provide other limited legal assistance; or
  • CLAS lawyers who are able to provide further limited help with submissions if required, following a hearing.

In addition to advocacy and representation, the BC Human Rights Clinic is contracted to provide Public Legal Education and Information, a Drop-in Clinic and Duty Counsel services.

Click here to learn more about human rights

HOW DO I GET STARTED?       

Find Contact Information, Hours of Service and more at the BC Human Rights Clinic Service Listing for this service on the HelpMap.

Click here to learn more about Community Legal Assistance Society (CLAS)

 

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Online Dispute Resolution in BC: Case Study #2

Intro | Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3


Our last Online Dispute Resolution (ODR) case study showcased Consumer Protection BC’s online platform.

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Resolve your dispute with Consumer Protection BC’s online platform

We have an update: the platform will be used as an early resolution tool for select BC-licensed debt collection agencies. Their aim is to help consumers who don’t feel comfortable speaking to debt collectors over the phone, and who would rather communicate online.

Visit Consumer Protection BC’s blog page for more info on the debt collection pilot project.

Small Claims BC

We now continue with our ODR series, this time focusing on Small Claims BC.

British Columbians who have disputes where the amount is no more than $25,000 turn to Small Claims Court to find a resolution. However, on average, claims take over a year to reach a judgment.

SmallClaimsBC.ca provides British Columbians with an alternative way to settle disputes without going to court using their ODR platform. Using ODR can help save time and money, which make sense as priorities when you are disputing a smaller amount.

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Click to enlarge infographic

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New users to the platform will be asked a series of questions to create an online profile before starting their claim. If you already have an account set up as a “returning user”, you need only enter your credentials to access the dashboard.

Small_Claims_window

Enter your information to complete your online account. This creates a dashboard where your claim(s) can be accessed and managed.

Continue reading Online Dispute Resolution in BC: Case Study #2

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New Service Alert: Tax Assistance & Information for People with Disabilities

tax_aid

Today’s post introduces a New Service from Disability Alliance BC, a Clicklaw Contributor.

Who can use this service?

People receiving BC disability benefits: the Persons with Disabilities (PWD) or Persons with Persistent and Multiple Barriers (PPMB) benefit and need help filing income tax returns from past years.

Click here to learn more about BC disability benefits.

What can this new service do for you?

  • Help you gather the documents necessary to file your taxes
  • Meet with you one-on-one to help you file your basic
    income tax return
  • Provide information and advice (in-person, or by phone and/or email) about filing income tax returns – See their informational page on the Benefits of Tax Filing
  • Provide referrals to community organizations in your area that can help with more complex tax returns
  • Access advice and support for you from a chartered accountant if your tax return is complex

How do I get started?

Find Contact Information, Hours of Service, and more at Disability Alliance BC‘s Service Listing for this service on the HelpMap:

Click here for Tax Assistance & Information for People with Disabilities – Service Listing

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New Service Alert: TRAC now provides Full Representation

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Today’s post introduces Direct Representation from TRAC, a Clicklaw contributor. TRAC now provides free full representation to tenants at dispute resolution hearings in limited situations depending on eligibility and location:

Who?
Eligibility criteria to receive representation from TRAC:
– Income
– Types of Cases

Where?
The Lower Mainland, with some exceptions

TRAC reserves the right to use its discretion on a case-by-case basis, and has the final say regarding which tenants receive assistance. There may be times when TRAC is unable to represent a tenant who falls under the criteria above due to time constraints or other factors.

For more information check out TRAC’s Direct Representation page or contact the Tenant Infoline at 604-255-0546 or 1-800-665-1185.

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Justice Theatre Heads to Haida Gwaii for Restorative Justice Forums

by People’s Law SchoolJustice_Theatre

This fall, the People’s Law School launches the first two of its Access to Restorative Justice Community Forums on the Haida Gwaii Islands. The forums, held in partnership with the Haida Gwaii Restorative Justice Program, will take place in Queen Charlotte City on September 15, 2015 and in Masset the following day. Additional restorative justice forums are scheduled for later in the fall in Prince Rupert and Terrace.

The aim of the community forums is to increase the use of restorative justice processes by victims of crime. The forums plan to address issues such as:

  • How can victims of crime and offenders have better access to the restorative justice approach?
  • What needs to be done to strengthen the relationships between police-based victim services and restorative justice agencies?

What is restorative justice?

Restorative justice seeks to repair the harm caused by crime by addressing the needs of victims, engaging the community in the justice process, and encouraging dialogue and healing. Restorative justice involves bringing together the victim, offender and members of the community to discuss the effects of the crime. At a restorative justice session the focus is on the impact of the crime and how to address the harm that was done.

In this approach, crime is understood not only as breaking the law, but as a violation of people, relationships and a disruption of the peace in the community.

Restorative justice principles draw from Aboriginal experience and tradition, including the belief that the community has primary responsibility for addressing crime.

You can find a description of restorative justice on the JusticeBC website.

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Do you know how a Bill becomes Law in Canada?

billc51_timeline

How did Bill C-51 become law?

You’ve probably heard some rumblings about Bill C-51, the Anti-terrorism Act, 2015. You likely don’t hear about most bills unless you are actively interested in law or politics, but Bill C-51 has struck a chord with everyday people who are concerned about their privacy rights. Here are some places you can go to learn about Bill C-51.

Do you know how Bill C-51 became law on June 18th? We’ll try and break it down for you.

Some basics first

canada_flagCanada’s Constitution defines the government’s powers and your rights. It includes the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The constitution is the supreme law of Canada and all of our laws must conform to it, whether made by our courts or government law-makers (legislators). More on the Constitution here.

There are two primary sources of Canadian law (Quebec is an exception):

Continue reading Do you know how a Bill becomes Law in Canada?

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Clicklaw Wikibooks Go Mobile!

Mobile_3Devices
Both the Galaxy S4 and Nexus 5 run on Android. The iPhone runs on iOS. But you get a similar experience looking at wiki.clicklaw.bc.ca across all devices.

Do you have a smartphone? You can already read the Clicklaw blog in a mobile-friendly format, and our Clicklaw Wikibooks (which have helpful legal info on family law, residential tenancy law, wills and estates, and more) now have a mobile option too. We are working on making the main Clicklaw website mobile-friendly, stay tuned.

Why go mobile? Mobile use is not going away; in fact, it’s increasing every year. Nearly 33% of visitors to Clicklaw and the Clicklaw Wikibooks are on either mobile or tablet. We wanted to make the experience better for you, across all devices.

Here’s what you see when you go to a specific Clicklaw Wikibook:

Mobile_Inside_Wikibook

You still have the option of downloading the Wikibook in PDF, EPUB, or ordering a print copy–right from your phone.

See more features below the cut..

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